Masonry Tools - Popular Questions, Answers, Tips & Manuals


look to the place that sold it to you . we do not know who that was where you live

Masonry Tools | 29 views | 0 helpful votes


Model 149.23628 and part number are the same.

Masonry Tools | 166 views | 0 helpful votes


Not quite your model, this is the 3750, but direct from Menard. Details and parts list at the bottom

https://c.shld.net/assets/docs/spin_prod_916281512.pdf

https://www.menards.com/main/tools/power-tools/woodworking-tools/performax-reg-15-amp-corded-planer/240-3750/p-1444443002172.htm

Masonry Tools | 103 views | 0 helpful votes


that model number doesnt jive with sears website. im sure if you can spec the current sprocket you can get one from any bearing supplier or mcmaster even

Masonry Tools | 111 views | 2 helpful votes


There is one for sale on KIJJI for about 100 dollars

Masonry Tools | 139 views | 1 helpful votes


TRY THEIR WEBSITE

Masonry Tools | 251 views | 0 helpful votes


Not all portable thicknessers have a power feed and the stock does have to be forced through.

Planers with a power feed can be choosy about whether they work or not, depending on the size of cut the planer is set for - too big a cut and they don't work, too small a cut and they don't work. This is especially true of those entering middle-age. Considering most of the parts for your machine are obsolete and no longer stocked, I guess that is where your machine is now...

You need to examine your machine to check it it has a power feed and if it does, you need to dismantle it and check all the parts and the drive are fit for the purpose.

Delta Masonry... | 713 views | 0 helpful votes


It is a long time since I encountered the Elu brand. I had to junk some Elu stuff 30 years ago due to inability to obtain spares. At least bearings are mostly standard items that can be sourced from many suppliers.

I haven't replaced bearings on an Elu jointer but the design and construction is probably similar to other brands so the process is largely intuitive using the usual techniques - warming plastics, aluminium housings and using bearing pullers when appropriate.

If all else fails keep removing bits until the part you need is what remains. Often that is the only method that works due to such tools being designed to be assembled in the least possible time and least possible number of operations. Sometimes the construction is downright sneaky...

It doesn't matter if the original bearings get knocked about or stressed by the removal process but ensure the new bearings are treated gently and not stressed by pressing only on the inner race to fit on a shaft, the outer race to fit into a housing or alternatively warming a housing will ease assembly.

Good luck!

Masonry Tools | 1,073 views | 1 helpful votes

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