Question about Drywall

2 Answers

What material needs to be on Wall after drywall

Posted by on

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 3 Answers

Plastering is next then sanding hire a vacuum sander from a hire place, then it's ready for painting or wallpaper

Posted on Mar 03, 2019

Ad

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Welcome Back:

    Visited the website for 2 consecutive days.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 5 Answers

Screws if you have not already used. Then as follows:
Joint compound
Joint tape
Then texture if desired
Primer
Paint

Posted on Mar 03, 2019

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I want to replace my vanity top in the power room. i vanity top touches the wall on each side. I have measured wall to wall and it's 36 inches wide but all standard vanity tops are 37 inches wide. To...


yes simply remove the drywall from both sides of where you are installing the cabinet then either cut the old pieces to fit above and drywall tape over the seam where you cutthe old piece out or get a new piece of drywall and cut it to fit into the space above alternatively you can try to cut into the drywall perfect fit which you would then just silicon around to fill the seam

Jan 10, 2015 | Televison & Video

Tip

Minor Drywall Repairs


<span>It takes about 4 days for a good patch to be made. You can buy the materials in small quantities at the hardware store, so it won't cost much at all for a small hole, and a little more for a larger one.<br /><br />For a hole smaller than a tennis ball, you can press newspaper crumpled loosely into a ball into the hole, as much as you need, to build the hole up to just below the surface, then cover with overlapping layers of drywall mesh tape. The directions for a larger hole follow, and you can skip the first parts of it if you do not need them (if you are using the newspaper method.). With this method (newspaper) the most important part is to remember that the first coat of spackling is just to anchor the tape and bridge the repair, no more.<br /><br />The easiest way to repair a larger hole in wall board:<br />1. Cut a piece of new wall board larger than the hole you want to repair.<br />2. Take your wallboard "patch and hold it over the hole. Draw the outline of the patch on the wall.<br />3. Using a drywall saw, cut out the outline of the patch on the wall.<br />4. Cut a piece of wood longer than the hole is tall, by about 4". Measure back from each end 2".<br />5. Start a drywall screw 1" above the patch outline, centered. Align the wood in the hole with the lines you made on it at 2" back from the ends. Screw the drywall screw into the wood. Do the same at the bottom. You'll want the drywall screw to be below the surface while trying not to break the paper surface of the drywall.<br />5. Fit your patching piece into the cavity, and, depending on how large the hole is screw through the patch and into the wood with one or two drywall screws.<br />5. Using self-adhesive drywall tape, tape the crack around the patch, overlapping at the corners.<br />6. Use pre-mixed drywall spackling with a 4" putty knife to apply the first coat of drywall spackling to the patch. The aim here is to secure the new drywall to the old, so you need to use the putty knife to press the spackling into the crack, and lightly coat the drywall tape. If your screws that were used to secure your wood to the back of the old drywall are outside of the tape, press the spackling into the screw dimples as well. If you hear a "ticking" sound as you pass over the screws with the spackling, the screw isn't set deep enough. Give it another turn or so, until you don't hear it tick when you pass over it with the knife. Let all of this dry for 24 hours. Clean your tools, and dry them.<br />7. The next day, sand any burrs that stick out, but sand lightly, trying to taper the patch out onto the old wall. Don't be too particular, as there is still a ways to go. Using the drywall knife and spackling, re-coat the patch, blending more onto the wall, and leaving a little more material in the mesh of the drywall tape. The cracks should be refilled, as they'll have shrunken in overnight, so this is all done at the same time. Don't over-work it, just give it a good coating, and leave it alone. The screws that you previously spackled will get another coating at this time as well. You're done for the day, clean and dry your tools.<br />8. The next day, lightly sand the burrs, again feathering a bit onto the wall. Try to remove the dust from sanding with a dry cloth, lightly brushing the patch and wall. This should be the final coat today. Lightly apply your spackling, feathering it out onto the wall. The aim here is to make the finished repair invisible to the eye, so feather out onto the wall at least the width of your blade, if possible. You can fill the screw holes again as needed, feathering the spackling out from the screw dimples onto the patch and wall. Done for the day. Clean and dry your tools.<br />9. Day 4. Sand the patch, feathering out from the patch and across the patch. It should appear relatively flat to the eye, with the cracks and screw holes filled and feathered. No tape should be sticking out. It will all appear smooth. It is ready for matching paint.<br />Hope that this was helpful.<br />Best regards, --W/D--</span>

on Feb 03, 2011 | Plumbing

Tip

Fiberglass/Mesh Tape Mythe


I've heard people say many times, " When I finished the drywall on my room addition, I used Mesh Tape
www.all-wall.com/Categories/Fiberglass-Mesh-Drywall-Tape/Thin-Drywall-Mesh-Tape

on my seams and inside corners". Well, I would strongly recommend that you use Paper Tape instead:
www.all-wall.com/Categories/Drywall-Joint-Tape

along with All-Purpose Compound: www.usg.de/index.php?id=1357

Even though Fiberglass/Mesh Tape is much easier to apply than Paper Tape, you should not use it because it has a greater tendency to crack when applied to New Drywall seams; unless you use Easy Sand 45, 90, or 220.
www.lowes.com/pd_11778-325-384210_4294864808+4294851233_4294937087_?productId=3009562&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr'0''p_product_quantity_sold'1&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl_SHEETROCK%2BBrand_4294864808%2B4294851233_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr'0''p_product_quantity_sold'1

The different numbers ( 45, 90, 220) indicate the amount of time, ( in minutes), that you have to work with this material before it starts setting up on you. TIP: I would not recommend this material if you are a beginner! The consistency of this material varies as time goes on, becoming thicker and thicker.

Mesh Tape is good for many other uses though. Such as, a fracture in the drywall, patching around electrical boxes, applying to corner bead as a strengthening material, or removing old tape and re-taping old rough seams in a rehab house.

Good Luck!

If you should have any questions about"Drywall Finishing/Patching", or know someone who does, put your questions to Category:"Tools- Building & Power-HAND TOOLS" at FixYa.com

I will do my best to answer your questions about drywall finishing. However, it would be best if we could speak on the PHONE or do a live CHAT. I can answer any question you have if it involves getting a wall ready for paint!

Thanks for looking,

Jim

Key Words: Drywall/Sheetrock/Gypsum Wallboard

on Sep 29, 2010 | Hand Tools

1 Answer

My 2012 wall air condioner is leaking. How do I fix this and repair the drywall?


It sounds like the drain line is plugged where it goes outdoors, so water is backing up inside the unit until it spills over indoors. Clear the drain line.

You may need to cut a section out of the drywall where it's been damaged, then get a matching piece of new drywall to replace it. If you can cut down the centers of two studs, all the better - then you can screw the new patch directly to the studs on both sides. If not... at least leave yourself a couple of inches of drywall to stitch to - you can do that by screwing small pieces of plywood to the existing drywall, overlapping the hole. Then you can screw the new drywall patch to the plywood.

Next is your adventure in taping & mudding & sanding the drywall to finish the patch. Last, paint it to match the rest of the wall... or repaint all of that wall, including the patch. No need to paint adjacent walls, if your color matching is pretty close.

Jul 26, 2014 | Samsung MH052FNCA 18000 BTU High Wall 410A...

2 Answers

What speed would i need to set my cordless drill at to put hole in wall


Your drill will drill a hole at any speed, the drill bit needs to be sharp to drill the mateirial.The type of wall material is important.Drywall is soft but a masonry bit should be used.A masonry bit has a flat bar accross the point and slower speeds are best.Wood walls / studs you need wood bits that are sharper and medium to high speeds are used.Concrete or Block walls again require Masonry bits.If very hard concrete as in foundation walls or filled block the use of a Hammer drill will work much faster.Good Luck

Jul 29, 2011 | Drills

Tip

Patching a hole in drywall/sheetrock


The best way to patch a hole when you don't have backing material is as follows:

Step 1: Cut the hole out square with a keyhole saw or utility knife:
www.all-wall.com/s.nl/sc.11/.f?search=keyhole+saw

Step 2: Cut a piece of drywall, (the same thickness as the wall that you are working on), to fit fairly tightly into square hole. (HINT: You don't want the patch to fit so tight that it breaks the corners when you try to put it in.) If done properly, this patch will not want to stay in the hole by itself. You must leave 1/32nd of an inch all the way around the patch. Once the patch has been properly fitted, you are now ready to start taping it in.

Step 3: Put the patch face down on the floor or table so that you can easily work on it. Using drywall mud/compound & the 5" knife, lightly mud the back side of the patch (www.all-wall.com/Categories/Joint-Knives/Hyde-Stainless-Hammer-Head). Place a piece of drywall tape over the patch, allowing it to hang over the edge of the patch about 1 1/2" on the top/bottom of the patch (paper tape flaps).(www.tooldistrict.com/2inx500ftpaperjointtapepn500bypermaglas-mesh.aspx) Holding the tape firmly against the patch, wipe down the tape with the 5" knife.

Step 4: Once the piece of tape is wiped down, you are now ready to apply mud to the section of wall where the paper tape flaps will be laying. Place the patch over the hole, tapping it into place until the patch is laying flat on the wall. Holding your fingers on the seams of the patch, wipe down the first paper flap, and then the other. (HINT: Always wipe down the top flap first, then the bottom flap. Make sure the patch is flush with the wall, or recessed slightly. If the patch is sticking out from the wall even a little bit, it will be very difficult to hide!)

Step 5: Now that the patch is in, mud the horizontal seams in, paper tape, and wipe down. Repeat the process for the vertical seams. (NOTE: You may use mesh tape on these seams if you wish because mesh is a little thinner than the paper tape; making it a little easier to cover on the next two coats. Don't make a special purchase if you don't already have some laying around, it's not worth it. ( www.all-wall.com/Categories/Fiberglass-Mesh-Drywall-Tape/Thin-Drywall-Mesh-Tape )Let this dry for 12 hours before coating again.

Step 6: For the next coat you will need a 10 " broad knife (www.all-wall.com/Categories/Taping-Knives-Stainless-Steel/Hyde-Maxxgrip-Extruded-Back) Apply mud to the patch, covering the tape from the previous application.You will need to leave more mud around the outside of the patch; not too much on top of the tape. It is already going to be a little high on top of the tape so you are basically creating an optical illusion by building up around the patch. Let this coat dry 24 hours.

Step 7: If the 2nd coat was done properly, then putting a finish coat, (3rd and final coat), won't be a problem. This coat is just to fill in any low spots that you weren't able to get completely full the last coat. And if you did get it full the last time, congrats, then it is just a skim coat to fill in any air bubbles that may exist. (NOTE: Whenever patching over an already painted wall, the drywall mud/compound will bubble. This is normal. After 2nd coat of mud drys, scrape off the air bubbles before applying the next coat.) Let this coat dry for 12-24 hours

Step 8: Now the fun part begins: Use a sanding sponge or a sanding pole to sand the patch off, (http://www.all-wall.com/acatalog/A000_Dustless_Sanding_20.php). Then it is ready for paint!!

Good Luck!

If you should have any questions about"Drywall Finishing/Patching", or know someone who does, put your questions to Category:"Tools- Building & Power-HAND TOOLS" at FixYa.com

I will do my best to answer your questions about drywall finishing, but as you can see, just a simple patch is very involved. However, it would be best if we could speak on the PHONE or do a live CHAT. I can answer any question you have if it involves getting a wall ready for paint!

Jim

Key Words: Drywall/Sheetrock/Gypsum Wallboard, Patching, Texturing, Speckling, & Paper Tape

on Dec 01, 2009 | Hand Tools

1 Answer

How do I find the wall bracket to attached bathroom hardware to?


conniesieber-

To locate wood framing in the wall you will need an electronic "stud-finder", which can detect the relative change in density of materials within the wall and will sound an alarm when those materials are encountered. However, the odds the framing is exactly where you want to hang the towel bar is slim. Another option is to use anchors - there are different types of anchors for drywall, for lath and plaster, and for tile/tileboard. There are anchors that will work for your specific application.

The folks at your local hardware store will make sure you get the right type of anchor. Then follow the instructions that come with the anchors and the towel bar.

If you need further instructions as you proceed, don't hesitate to reply to this message and I will try to answer your questions.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

DIYpro

May 03, 2011 | Gatco & Channel& Satin Nickel Towel Bar

1 Answer

Fixture for curtainrail wentthroughplasterboardbig hole now help.me fix please


Hi, W/D here.

It takes about 4 days for a good patch to be made. You can buy the materials in small quantities at the hardware store, so it won't cost much at all for a small hole, and a little more for a larger one.

For a hole smaller than a tennis ball, you can press newspaper crumpled loosely into a ball into the hole, as much as you need, to build the hole up to just below the surface, then cover with overlapping layers of drywall mesh tape. The directions for a larger hole follow, and you can skip the first parts of it if you do not need them (if you are using the newspaper method.). With this method (newspaper) the most important part is to remember that the first coat of spackling is just to anchor the tape and bridge the repair, no more.

The easiest way to repair a larger hole in wall board:
1. Cut a piece of new wall board larger than the hole you want to repair.
2. Take your wallboard "patch and hold it over the hole. Draw the outline of the patch on the wall.
3. Using a drywall saw, cut out the outline of the patch on the wall.
4. Cut a piece of wood longer than the hole is tall, by about 4". Measure back from each end 2".
5. Start a drywall screw 1" above the patch outline, centered. Align the wood in the hole with the lines you made on it at 2" back from the ends. Screw the drywall screw into the wood. Do the same at the bottom. You'll want the drywall screw to be below the surface while trying not to break the paper surface of the drywall.
5. Fit your patching piece into the cavity, and, depending on how large the hole is screw through the patch and into the wood with one or two drywall screws.
5. Using self-adhesive drywall tape, tape the crack around the patch, overlapping at the corners.
6. Use pre-mixed drywall spackling with a 4" putty knife to apply the first coat of drywall spackling to the patch. The aim here is to secure the new drywall to the old, so you need to use the putty knife to press the spackling into the crack, and lightly coat the drywall tape. If your screws that were used to secure your wood to the back of the old drywall are outside of the tape, press the spackling into the screw dimples as well. If you hear a "ticking" sound as you pass over the screws with the spackling, the screw isn't set deep enough. Give it another turn or so, until you don't hear it tick when you pass over it with the knife. Let all of this dry for 24 hours. Clean your tools, and dry them.
7. The next day, sand any burrs that stick out, but sand lightly, trying to taper the patch out onto the old wall. Don't be too particular, as there is still a ways to go. Using the drywall knife and spackling, re-coat the patch, blending more onto the wall, and leaving a little more material in the mesh of the drywall tape. The cracks should be refilled, as they'll have shrunken in overnight, so this is all done at the same time. Don't over-work it, just give it a good coating, and leave it alone. The screws that you previously spackled will get another coating at this time as well. You're done for the day, clean and dry your tools.
8. The next day, lightly sand the burrs, again feathering a bit onto the wall. Try to remove the dust from sanding with a dry cloth, lightly brushing the patch and wall. This should be the final coat today. Lightly apply your spackling, feathering it out onto the wall. The aim here is to make the finished repair invisible to the eye, so feather out onto the wall at least the width of your blade, if possible. You can fill the screw holes again as needed, feathering the spackling out from the screw dimples onto the patch and wall. Done for the day. Clean and dry your tools.
9. Day 4. Sand the patch, feathering out from the patch and across the patch. It should appear relatively flat to the eye, with the cracks and screw holes filled and feathered. No tape should be sticking out. It will all appear smooth. It is ready for matching paint.
Hope that this was helpful.
Best regards, --W/D--

Feb 03, 2011 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

I have constructed a hall for the purpose of meetings. But now there is too much of echoing within the hall. even without loud speakers. With loud speakers, it gets worse. How solve this problem of echoing


Excessive room echo is caused primarily by two things - hard surfaces and high ceilings. The worst materials are glass, marble and concrete block. Next to this is drywall. The more hard surfaces you have, the worse the echo will be. For example an entirely drywall room is much worse than one with drywall walls and an acoustic tile ceiling. The sound simply bounces from the back wall, to the front, to the ceiling, to the floor, back to the walls, floor, ceiling and so on. The solution of course is to reduce the amount of hard surface area.You need to coat the wall with some sort of acoustical wall treatment. Carpet on the walls will work or you can purchase materials for that purpose. How much to install and how much area to cover will require experimentation. There are many choices and this is just one.
http://www.acousticalsolutions.com/
An online search will provide many options. Search will the term "Acoustical Wall Treatment"

Oct 08, 2010 | Hammering

1 Answer

The studs in my wall are 20 inches apart and the wall mount requires them to be 16 inches apart. what do I do?


If I were in that situation I would fabricate a way to mount it using L brackets.
Using at least 2 and up to 4 L brackets of 2" in length I would drill one hole into the stud and the other end can be put in with a drywall anchor or other bolt-anchor type for your wall material.
I believe there are also wall mount types requiring use of only one stud...but don't quote me on it.

Jan 10, 2010 | Televison & Video

Not finding what you are looking for?
Drywall Logo

Related Topics:

158 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Drywall Experts

ray gallant

Level 3 Expert

66184 Answers

John Donghia Jr.
John Donghia Jr.

Level 2 Expert

47 Answers

Are you a Drywall Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...