Question about 1991 Honda Accord

1 Answer

1991 Honda Accord had the brakes change new rotors and pads. Drove 50 miles and the front drive axle where it goes into the front wheel looks and acts like it is stripped out. It's making bad noise if you try and drive. Could it be related to the brake job? Is there something they could have not tightened to cause this.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Honda Master
  • 6,826 Answers

Brake Disc (Rotor) REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1990-95 Accord

  1. If equipped with an air bag, disconnect the negative battery cable and properly disable the Supplemental Restraint System (SRS), as detailed in Section 6 of this manual.
  2. Loosen the lug nuts, then Raise and safely support the vehicle on jackstands.
  3. Remove the wheels.
  4. Remove the steering knuckle from the vehicle. Please refer to Section 8 for procedures.
  5. Remove the 4 bolts retaining the hub unit to the steering knuckle and remove the hub unit. Fig. 4: Remove the 4 bolts retaining the hub unit to the steering knuckle and remove the hub unit/rotor assembly 1991 Honda Accord had the brakes change new rotors - 86809032.gif

  6. Remove the 4 bolts, then separate the hub unit from the brake rotor. Fig. 5: Remove the 4 bolts, then separate the hub unit from the brake rotor
    To install:
  7. Assemble the disc to the hub unit and tighten the bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm).
  8. When installing the hub to the knuckle, use new self-locking bolts and tighten them to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm).
  9. Install the steering knuckle.
  10. Lower the vehicle and check for proper brake operation.
  11. If equipped, enable the SRS system and connect the negative battery cable.
<1991 Honda Accord had the brakes change new rotors - prev.gifhttp://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/8680/8680R09_OVERHAU1.htm">prev.gif next.gif

Posted on Oct 29, 2010

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

CHANGING THE FRONT WHEEL BEARING 1991 ACCORD


Parts book shows both a bearing and a hub assembly so it depends on your situation.
To replace a bearing, you have to remove the wheel and brakes, then disconnect the spindle and the axle shaft.
Not something a DIY can do in a driveway without some major tools.

Jul 01, 2012 | 1991 Honda Accord

1 Answer

My mechanic tells me I need rear brake pads and rotors as a cost of $ 320.00. I have 60000 miles on the car. I can't believe I need brakes so soon with low mileage.


The way in which a car has driven has a very direct impact on how long brake pads will last before they have to be replaced. For example, if you spend most of your time driving long distances on the highway, you're using your brakes much less often than in stop and go urban driving. I have seen cars that need brake jobs every 75,000 miles; I've seen similar cars, with different drivers and different driving routines, go 25,000 miles between brake jobs.

I would not be surprised at all if the front brake pads (and possibly rotors) of your Accord needed to be replaced at 60k miles of typical mixed driving. I am, however, somewhat surprised that your rear brakes need service at this point. The front brakes of a car typically provide much more of a car's stopping power than the rear brakes (it's a physics thing), and so they generally wear much more quickly than the rear brakes. All that said, I recently had to replace the rear brake pads and rotors of a 2002 Passat that had only 51,000 miles on the odometer. This car's pads were worn down to the metal, and one of the rotors was badly scored. Upon speaking with the owner of the car, though, things made slightly more sense. First, the car was equipped with a very active ABS braking system, which decreases front wheel braking and increases rear wheel braking depending on road conditions. As a result, the rear brakes of that car were used much more heavily than in the "average" car. Second, and more obviously, the owner admitted to forgetting to release her parking brake several times before driving off, sometimes going several miles before realizing her mistake. The emergency brake system on most cars engages the rear brakes, and driving off with those brakes still on will put a huge amount of wear on those pads in a very short distance.

One final, distant, thought is that it's possible that your rear calipers have gotten "sticky" and are not fully releasing after they have been engaged. Accumulated moisture on the brake pistons and piston channel walls can leave rust spots that hang up piston travel, leading to this condition. At the same time, it would be unusual for both brakes on the same axle to develop this problem at the same time--this typically happens one brake caliper at a time, and you notice the condition when you car begins pulling to one side when you brake or even after you release your brakes.

May 19, 2011 | 2003 Honda Accord

2 Answers

What problems will come with a 1990 Honda Accord with a passenger wheel turned in? Is it the axle? Should I purchase a car with this problem?


not really big problem on the axle they cost about $60 on the axle with exchanged labor will cost you about $80 to $100 its been worn out for about 80 to 150 miles when rubber cover loose or rip-off.

Feb 26, 2011 | 1990 Honda Accord

1 Answer

How do you remove the rotors from a 1991 honda accord?


Loosen both front wheel lug nuts and raise car and support on jack stands. Remove wheels and have a friend hold brake pedal down and remove axle nut. Use a chisel or screwdriver to remove stake on nut to axle edge. I use a 3/4 drive set socket and remove axle nut. Rent it from Autozone. Remove caliper assy and support with coat hanger or bungee cord to hold weight of assy off of brake hose. Remove Cotter pin and nut on lower control arm. Separate with ball joint fork and pull strut assy away to the side while pulling stub axle through and out of the way. Remove 4 bolts holding rotor and hub assy. on the inside of steering knuckle and separate. Now remove 4 bolts on hub's outer side and separate rotor and hub. You can use a bar or large screwdriver between wheel studs to loosen the 4 bolts.

Aug 04, 2010 | 1991 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Over heating brakes in hot weather with a strong smell


When was the last time your brakes where replaced. Your rims can get hot sometimes even on short trips depending on how often you need to use your brakes. But if your pads are low and "burning up" you may want to look into getting them replaced before they cause rotor damage. You will also loose braking performance and loose stopping power.

Jul 12, 2010 | 1994 Honda Accord

3 Answers

Resurfacing front rotors


This tutorial will help you : http://www.ehow.com/how_4719219_off-brake-rotors.html
Some after market brake pads are better than the company fitted ones, but they will be more costly.

Jun 01, 2010 | 2004 Honda Accord

1 Answer

How difficult is it to replace the drive axles on a Honda Accord by yourself? Should I also replace the oil seal at the same time? Somewhat mechanical, but never tackled something this big.


For some one that is mechanicaly inclined it would be a 3 out of 5 in the diffculty scale. You should be able to handle it if you feel comfortable with it. It invloves removing the brake pads and rotor. Releasing the lower ball joint from the control arm, and using a puller to seperate the shaft from the wheel bearing. If everthing goes fine up to this point, I would change the seal. Otherwise, I would only change it if there was a leak.

Apr 20, 2010 | 1998 Honda Accord

1 Answer

Ok when i am driving my car and when i need to apply the breaks they make a almost squealing noise but after i drive for a little the stop any help will be much appriciated


I have same problem; turns out all Honda Accords of this generation (2003-2007) do this. It has something to do with cold brakes and unseated pads, and the first time you stop from medium speed, you will hear a grinding, maybe from the back of the car (i think in my case).
My girlfriend looks at me, and we both wonder what it is, but it goes away in about 1 minute and I've realized it's only when the brakes are cold and it's not a problem. My brakes are basically ok, and there is nothing to fix...
I've done enough reading about this car on the internet, I feel pretty sure everybody's Accord does this, so I stopped worrying about it. A real problem, the sound would not go away as soon as the brakes warm up and seat the pads. After that, the breaks work fine.
If it was worn pads, the squealers will start up and not go away quickly. If it was a worse problem, the sound would grind continuously until fixed.
The two major problems with Honda Accord brakes are: 1) Brake judder at hi-speed medium braking. If you are going downhill, and just want to slow the car a little, if your rotors are getting worn, the steering wheel will give you feedback as brake judder. Hit the brakes harder, it will go away but it's scary and requires the rotors be replaced with a much higher quality rotor than came from the factory, and probably want to use ceramic pads (like Bendix CQ or CT). 2) Back brake pads wear down quickly. I read about this constantly with Accord owners, the EX back brakes are smaller rotors and pads than the front, but the electronic brake distribution system of the Accord will balance brake force between front and back, so the front pads will actually last longer than the back pads! This is very unusual but entirely normal for this car. Most cars are the opposite but that may change as we see new generations of cars with more evenly balanced braking front to rear. Be ready and watch your back brakes closely. Mine were toast at 30k...
I replaced my back pads and rotors, used cheapest new rotors I could find, and ceramic pads, and they have lasted considerably longer than the first set.
I now have 92k on my 2004 and the original front brakes are ready to be replaced. I replaced back brakes at 34k I think, and was very surprised they needed replacement at early, but the new pads have gone almost 60k, but look ready to be replaced sometime this year I think.
I have bad judder on high speed braking, but the pads are still ok in front. Rotors are **** in front and I'll replace with Centric Cryo-Stop rotors, they should last a long time as long as they get put on straight and I don't let anybody warp them with an air gun at the tire shop...
Two other more minor problems to watch for on this car: 3) Inner pads may wear faster than outer pads, because the caliper is on the inside, and forces the outside pads to contact the rotor after the inner pads are already braking. Seems like all Accords do this at least a little. The inner pads are not easily viewed without removing wheels, so it's hard to tell, but if your outer pads look like they are starting to get worn down pretty well, chances are good the inner pads are even more worn and you are ready to replace pads. 4) Pads may wear faster on one side of the car (fronts) faster than the other side. For example many people report driver side pads wear faster than passenger side. And the reasons proposed have to do with fast stopping for right hand turns or freeway loops. The car spends more time being braked in a right turn than a left over time.. But of course, on my car, it seems to be the opposite. The passenger side is wearing faster! Go figure..

Jan 12, 2010 | Honda Accord Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The left rear rotor on a 1991 nissan keeps breaking , i changed, pads, rotor, and calipar and when i drove the car it broke the peice over the lug nuts off of the peice that goes through the brake pads


sounds like to me a bearing is out are the rear axle is bent. jack up car on side that keeps breaking and roll the tire see if it moves side to side but it does have something to do with the axle.

Apr 05, 2009 | 1991 Nissan 240SX

1 Answer

Hi i have a 98 honda accord 4cyl 4wheel disc brakes.2 days ago i notice a rubbing & grinding noise in my right rear wheel when i applied my brakes at slow speed in and out,when i remove my foot from the...


NEVER swap rear tires... the radial tires are not made/designed to be driven one way and then driven the other... they WILL delaminate and come apart.. when you rotate tires, you rotate front and rear on the same side....(old bias-ply tires were rotated around a vehicle)
... if you did not have both sides of the rear brakes fitted with new pads and ..at least had the rotors turned.. do that. look closely at the inside of your wheels and make sure there has been no contact.... once you have made sure both sides are good.. reply back to me on here.. thanks... please mark as helpful.. thanks

Jun 15, 2017 | 2003 Honda Accord

Not finding what you are looking for?
1991 Honda Accord Logo

259 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Honda Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85223 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22485 Answers

Jonah Oneal

Level 3 Expert

14092 Answers

Are you a Honda Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...