Question about 2004 Oldsmobile Silhouette

1 Answer

V6 3.4l. Why is there winding noise and low fluid level?

Replaced power steering pump. Replaced fluids.

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  • Richard lanning Apr 04, 2016

    New pump put it on two weeks ago I did the recommendation as to bleed and put new fluids in. The pump came with new resivior. Recommendation I got was to leave it idle for 2 to three minutes ture full clock wise and then counter clock wise. The seemed gone the it the nose came back.

  • pwetherhill Apr 04, 2016

    In that case it's still not bled. Keep doing the turning. The whining noise is the pump working with no fluid in it (it uses its own fluid for lubrication and cooling).

  • Richard lanning Apr 04, 2016

    Very helpful ty

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  • 44 Answers

Turn the steering full to left then full to right ten times whilst stationary. This will bleed the system. Was it a new pump? If it continues go for warranty. If it wasn't, replace with new.

Posted on Apr 04, 2016

  • Richard lanning Apr 04, 2016

    New pump with new resivior

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Anonymous

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: Power steering sensor

Hello. I assume you have a 4.7 liter engine. Here is a picture of its location:

73b9f6e.gif

Posted on Oct 23, 2008

SOURCE: power steering fluid leek on 89 honda accord

Should not be too hard. I have not done one on an 1986 model but I have on a 1983. The principle will be the same.

  • You need to drain the fluid.
  • Disconnect all the pump hoses.
  • Release the pump pivot and adjustment bolts and remove the pump from the vehicle.
Replacement is the reversal of the removal operation.
  • Tighten all the bolts.
  • Adjust the drive belt tension.
  • Fill and bleed the system.
Following the above procedure should get the job done. Take your time doing the job and double check your work at the end of the job. Check for any fluid leeks from the system.

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

Anonymous

  • 56 Answers

SOURCE: 2004 4.2 ltr envoy power steering stopped working - no leaking

Most likely the power steering pump is your problem. It sounds like the shaft inside the pump has broken and it is not pumping fluid. I would install a new pump and see what happens. The other option would be the rack and pinion (steering gear). The power steering pump is the cheaper of the two and usually the problem. I hope this helps you.

Posted on Jan 06, 2009

Anonymous

  • 29 Answers

SOURCE: Audi power steering pump location

Before you replace the pump, check the filter located inside the oil tank. This filter cleans the oil before going to pump. REMEMBER that Audi uses a special oil!!! Not your normal power steering fluid! Mixing them could cause damage to the entire system!

Posted on Feb 05, 2009

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: 1999 oldsmobile silhouette van won't start. no power to fuel pump

I have a silhouette and it had the same problem
Follow the fuel pump wiring harness to where it plugs into the floor of the van--pull the connectors apart--they will probably be corroded, and you will possibly have to change both wiring harnesses or connectors.

Posted on May 25, 2009

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1 Answer

NEW POWER STEERING PUMP SAME LOW NOISE


I just had one too. I only had noise when the fluid level was low. I had leaking hoses. Once the hoses were replaced, the fluid stayed where it was after filling and the noise stopped. Check the level in the reservoir, there is hot level and a cold level.

Oct 13, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Power Steering Pump Noise


As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car. ... If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur.
Maybe you've heard it at a stop light. Maybe you've heard it as you pass a car on the freeway. Or maybe you've heard it in the parking lot at work when someone is leaving. The unmistakable whine of a power steering pump can make even the most confident mechanic wonder when that car will breakdown.
Power steering pump noise is a unique noise that your car may make and once you've heard it you always know what it is. The noise is a mix of a whirring and a whining and will always vary with the speed of your engine whether your car is driving or in park. This whining noise can be subtle or extremely loud and may be worse in colder weather, or right when you first start your car.
Power steering pumps are most often vain style centrifugal pumps that are tasked with pressurizing the power steering fluid and pushing it down to your power steering gear or rack. As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car.
There are a few reasons why you are hearing power steering pump noise from your car. First, it may simply be due to the design of the pump. Sometimes, noisy power steering pumps can continue to work flawlessly for years after they start making noise. This may simply be due to the manufacture's design or a tight tolerance in that particular pump. In this case, you would hear the noise but not see any other adverse effect like a loss in power steering, leaking fluid or a wobbly pulley. In this case, you may be able to help reduce your power steering pump noise by choosing a different type of power steering fluid, like a synthetic fluid.
Your power steering pump may also be making noises due to air trapped in the system. If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur. Even tiny air bubbles you cannot see that are trapping in the power steering fluid may be causing the whining you are hearing. In this case, the best thing to do is flush your power steering system to try and remove the air from the system. Having air trapped in your power steering system can be difficult to diagnose so you may need to simply try a power steering flush to see if it solves your problem.
Power Steering pump noise may also be due to a failing power steering pump. As the bearings on the impeller go bad it will start to make noise as the pump is turning. If you have a bad power steering pump you usually will also experience leaks from around the pulley, a wobbly pulley, or difficulty turning the steering wheel when you are stopped. If you have multiple of these symptoms together, it is probably time to replace your power steering pump.
Lastly, and most usually, a whining power steering pump is an indication of a low fluid level. Your power steering fluid is probably something you have rarely if ever checked, so it often comes as a surprise if the level is low. Your power steering fluid reservoir is also relatively small so even a slow leak will cause a low fluid level relatively quickly. To confirm this is your problem it is as simple as checking your power steering fluid level. Some power steering reservoirs are clear so you can see through them to check how full they are. You may have to wipe away some dirt and grime to find the "full" line, but it should be easy to check. If you have an opaque power steering fluid reservoir there should be a small dipstick under the cap that will help you measure the fluid level. If it is low, then you have a leak somewhere and topping off the fluid should quite down your power steering pump.
If you discover a power steering leak, rather than simply continuing to add fluid every time it gets low, you should fix the problem permanently so you don't have to continue to check your power steering fluid level. Replacing lines or seals can be a surprisingly difficult task due to the location of your power steering pump and steering gear or rack. The easiest way to seal your leak is to do it from the inside out!

try this link out for more power steering problems.
Power steering whining sqreeching Google Search

on Dec 14, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Why my 99/00 dodge neon makes a winding noise around the power steering pump


Possible low fluid level. Low fluid will cause the pump to whine

Oct 25, 2015 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Noise when turning


Either your power steering fluid level is low, your power steering fluid needs to be replaced, or your power steering pump is failing.

May 17, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Impala 2011 steering power noise


Have you checked the level of the power steering fluid if it is low it can cause a noise similar to what you described. The power steering pump could be starting to fail and making the noise. I would suggest checking the power steering fluid level and if low, they make some fluid that has power steering fluid conditioner, supposed to help extend the life of the power steering pump, if it is low you need to follow the lines from the pump and see if you can find a leak anywhere. also I would take notice of the color of the power steering fluid, if not too much trouble maybe take a picture of the fluid and upload it here, the fluid can break down and need to be replaced.

Mar 20, 2013 | 2011 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Power steering whining, sqreeching


hi Eva.
As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car. ... If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur.
Maybe you've heard it at a stop light. Maybe you've heard it as you pass a car on the freeway. Or maybe you've heard it in the parking lot at work when someone is leaving. The unmistakable whine of a power steering pump can make even the most confident mechanic wonder when that car will breakdown.
Power steering pump noise is a unique noise that your car may make and once you've heard it you always know what it is. The noise is a mix of a whirring and a whining and will always vary with the speed of your engine whether your car is driving or in park. This whining noise can be subtle or extremely loud and may be worse in colder weather, or right when you first start your car.
Power steering pumps are most often vain style centrifugal pumps that are tasked with pressurizing the power steering fluid and pushing it down to your power steering gear or rack. As you turn your steering wheel it is this fluid pressure that aids in turning the wheels of your car.
There are a few reasons why you are hearing power steering pump noise from your car. First, it may simply be due to the design of the pump. Sometimes, noisy power steering pumps can continue to work flawlessly for years after they start making noise. This may simply be due to the manufacture's design or a tight tolerance in that particular pump. In this case, you would hear the noise but not see any other adverse effect like a loss in power steering, leaking fluid or a wobbly pulley. In this case, you may be able to help reduce your power steering pump noise by choosing a different type of power steering fluid, like a synthetic fluid.
Your power steering pump may also be making noises due to air trapped in the system. If the pump impeller is trying to move power steering fluid and starts catching air bubbles it can cause whining noises and vibrations to occur. Even tiny air bubbles you cannot see that are trapping in the power steering fluid may be causing the whining you are hearing. In this case, the best thing to do is flush your power steering system to try and remove the air from the system. Having air trapped in your power steering system can be difficult to diagnose so you may need to simply try a power steering flush to see if it solves your problem.
Power Steering pump noise may also be due to a failing power steering pump. As the bearings on the impeller go bad it will start to make noise as the pump is turning. If you have a bad power steering pump you usually will also experience leaks from around the pulley, a wobbly pulley, or difficulty turning the steering wheel when you are stopped. If you have multiple of these symptoms together, it is probably time to replace your power steering pump.
Lastly, and most usually, a whining power steering pump is an indication of a low fluid level. Your power steering fluid is probably something you have rarely if ever checked, so it often comes as a surprise if the level is low. Your power steering fluid reservoir is also relatively small so even a slow leak will cause a low fluid level relatively quickly. To confirm this is your problem it is as simple as checking your power steering fluid level. Some power steering reservoirs are clear so you can see through them to check how full they are. You may have to wipe away some dirt and grime to find the "full" line, but it should be easy to check. If you have an opaque power steering fluid reservoir there should be a small dipstick under the cap that will help you measure the fluid level. If it is low, then you have a leak somewhere and topping off the fluid should quite down your power steering pump.
If you discover a power steering leak, rather than simply continuing to add fluid every time it gets low, you should fix the problem permanently so you don't have to continue to check your power steering fluid level. Replacing lines or seals can be a surprisingly difficult task due to the location of your power steering pump and steering gear or rack. The easiest way to seal your leak is to do it from the inside out!

or check this link out for more info on this matter.
Power steering whining sqreeching Google Search

Dec 14, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

5 Answers

While turning the steering wheel there is a whining sound from the motor. What is it?


you can hear your power steering pump working and if it's whining, it may be low on fluid.
Check the fluid level with the engine running and be very careful of moving or rotating parts.
Locate the pump and check the level (the cap will usually have a dipstick to measure the level attached to the cap and you read it the same way as your engine oil dipstick). DO NOT overfill the pump as it will just leak out and cause other issues.
If the level is very low, top it up then work the steering from side to side a few times then recheck the level. Careful, power steering fluid can get very hot!!
If the fluid in the pump looks dark or black, take the vehicle to your local mechanic and have the fluid replaced and the system flushed.

Jan 14, 2011 | 2000 Oldsmobile Silhouette

1 Answer

Can low steering fluid cause mechanical problems


Problems associated with low power steering fluid…

Hard Vehicle Steering
A low power steering fluid level can often times cause a vehicle's steering to become hard and labored. Adequate amounts of power steering fluid are necessary to enable a vehicle's power steering system to function and operate at optimum levels. A lack of power steering fluid in a vehicle's power steering system reduces the amount of hydraulic fluid pressure necessary to efficiently operating the various parts of the entire power steering system. Power steering fluid supplies the fluid force needed to operate the power steering gears and to enable power steering gearbox operation. Low power steering fluid levels reduce this hydraulic pressure, which commonly results in hard vehicle steering.

Pump Noise
It is very common for a low power steering fluid level to cause significant power steering pump noise. An adequate amount of power steering fluid is required to ensure the proper function and longevity of a power steering pump unit, which is a belt-driven pump responsible for housing and circulating power steering pump fluid. A low level of power steering fluid results in increased power steering pump friction, heat, and wear, all of which can significantly reduce the operational life of the power steering pump while at the same time cause excessive power steering pump noise.

Fluid Boiling
Many times a low power steering fluid level can result in excessive heating of power steering fluid, a condition that can seriously degrade the fluid and cause it to boil. A low power steering fluid level results in less available fluid to both lubricate and cool a power steering pump unit. A lack of power steering pump lubrication and cooling leads to excessive heat being generated within the power steering pump unit itself, a condition that translates into the available level of power steering fluid becoming super-heated and degraded. When this happens it is common for the power steering fluid to boil and lose all of its lubricating and heat-reducing capabilities.

Gearbox Wear
The power steering gearbox is a set of gears within a vehicle's power steering system designed to facilitate movement of a vehicle's front wheels. The power steering gearbox is connected to the power steering pump by hydraulic fluid lines that deliver a constant supply of power steering fluid to the power steering gearbox. A low power steering fluid level, especially a chronic and severe low power steering fluid level, can lead to increased friction and wear within the power steering gearbox assembly, a condition that can significantly shorten the operational life of the power steering gearbox and negatively affect its operation

Nov 26, 2009 | 2003 Pontiac Grand Am

3 Answers

My power steering pump makes a growling noise even when the car is idle. The noise is louder when I turn the steering wheel. The power steering fluid has gotten low a couple of times and gets foamy.


if gets low definitely a leak foam is pump mixing fluid with air roar is pump cavitation check lines or pump for leak keep fluid at recommended level air bound unit can cause steering difficulty and or failure if need have trained mech look into problem

Oct 11, 2009 | 1999 Oldsmobile Cutlass

2 Answers

Winding noise


Change the power steering fluid. Use the Mercon V tranny fluid (also used in the power steering system).

Feb 10, 2009 | 2005 Ford Five Hundred

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