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What does Secondary Air Injection Pump - GM (12560095) do on a 2000 gmc jimmy?

I found a corroded hose but can't find the location for tail end of the vacuum hose by the master cylinder. Is it open ended?

Posted by Anonymous on

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  • Master
  • 457 Answers

Its part of the evap system it goes from the pump to the exhaust where the broken end is not far from there it goes.It mixes exhaust into the manifold when needed.

Posted on Aug 17, 2014

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Anonymous

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Steve Allison

  • 5569 Answers

SOURCE: Secondary air injection pump, 01 GMC Jimmy V6

You didn't mention the fuse rating of the one you replaced so this method may not help if it was higher than ~5 amps.At this point, I would wire a 12 volt bulb, preferably, one with 40-50 watts rating (headlamp will do fine) in place of the fuse that is blowing and start pulling likely connectors until the light goes out. If you don't get results this way, you might try disturbing one bundle of wire after another since this could be happening because of insulation that has been pinched or worn through to reach ground.
Using a bulb instead of bridging the fuse with a piece of coathanger will prevent melting the wire and possibly compounding the problem.   

Posted on Nov 24, 2008

Anonymous

  • 315 Answers

SOURCE: I need a link or a better explanation on the code

What does that mean? The P0410 code refers to the emissions system. The AIR pump puts air to the exhaust to lower emissions. It takes in outside air and pumps it through two one-way check valves into each bank of the exhaust.
About 90% of the time that this code is set, the one-way check valves have worn out or failed and allow water (which occurs naturally in the exhaust) back into the pump. In any cold climate, especially in climates with higher humidity, this water may be more excessive. The water partially fills the AIR pump, it can then freeze. When the PCM commands the pump on, if the pump is frozen it cannot turn, thus overloading the circuit and "popping" the fuse.
copyscape.gif Symptoms Possibly symptoms include:

  • MIL illumination obviously
  • Hesitation on acceleration
  • Noise from a bad/stuck AIR pump
Causes A code P0410 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:
  • Water may have collected in the AIR pump or the vent solenoid and frozen or corroded the pump
  • Blown AIR pump fuse due to freezing up
Possible Solutions Note: There is a technical service bulletin (TSB) regarding this code for a number of GM models. The TSB calls for the replacement of the AIR pump and the installation of a new secondary injection hose. The TSB can be found on this ACDelco site.
Additionally, if you simply replace the AIR pump the problem may return again (and again). If you replace the pump, also clean out the hoses and replace the one-way check valve. If this is on a GM model that the TSB applies to, follow those instructions in the link above. In a few cases, people have put a small hole in the rubber cover on the pump which allows any water to drain out.
Also, please note that this may be covered under the emissions warranty on the vehicle. If your vehicle is out of bumper-to-bumper warranty, check if the emissions warranty is still valid!
  • Replace the AIR pump AND one-way check valve
  • Test and clean the AIR pump AND test and replace the one-way air check valve
  • Replace the AIR pump inlet hose
  • Replace the AIR pump fuse (found under the hood)

Posted on Mar 06, 2009

6bta

  • 400 Answers

SOURCE: secondary air injection pump location

under the radiator on the passenger side of the truck. There is a little splash guard you will need to remove to see it, The guard is held in with 4 15mm headed bolts, then you will be able to see the bottom of the air pump.

Posted on Oct 26, 2009

Norman Green

  • 312 Answers

SOURCE: po411 code on a 2008 chevy impala lt can anyone

there is no po441 code on this vehicle there is a p0442.

Posted on Jan 11, 2010

Molson02536

Harvey N Tawatao

  • 3854 Answers

SOURCE: secondary air injection system

This is a pump that sits underneath your front bumper on the passenger side. It is about the size of a baseball and has two hoses going into it. I would suggest you replace it yourself as it would cost you about $360.00 if you were to go through the dealer.

Water intrusion is what will typically kill these electric pumps. There is a Technical service bulletin (#04-06-04-015) Regarding this problem, according to the tsb, you will need a new pump and there is a hose assy. #12590627) that has you reroute the pump from future water intrusion or it is guaranteed to fail again.

Although I have had water in the pump I did not see any indication of the inlet hose as the cause. It was suggested that the one way metal check valves ($15.00) that mount to the rt & lt exhaust manifold are worn and allow water from the exhaust to get sucked back into the pump. I first replaced the pump and within a week of dry weather driving the light came back on. I checked the pump and it was again full of water. I just replaced the valves which had deteriorated on the inside. So hopefully this will eliminate the problem. Note - The valves are impossible to remove without removing the 1/2 tubes (held on with 2 nuts) they are attached to the manifold with. The valve threads seize to the tube thread and had to be clamped in a vise to remove - I actually had to hacksaw the valve section to get it off the pipe. Careful as not to damage the threads.

Good luck and try autopartsdirect2you for a new pump and it has life time warranty.

TSB #04-06-04-015 - (Mar 22, 2004)

Condition
Some owners may comment on the check engine light being illuminated. Upon investigation, the technician may find a DTC P0410 indicating that there is a concern in the secondary air injection system.

Cause
Water may have collected in the AIR pump or the vent solenoid and frozen or corroded the pump.

Correction
Replace the AIR pump and install a new inlet hose and solenoid tube assembly using the following procedure:

Prep vehicle.
Raise vehicle on hoist.
Remove shield covering AIR pump.
Remove hose and vacuum lines from pump and solenoid.
Remove AIR pump inlet hose. Do not re-use.
Disconnect electrical connectors from pump and solenoid.
Remove pump mounting bolts and pump.
Transfer isolators from the old pump to the new pump.
Install new AIR pump and bolts to vehicle.

Tighten
Tighten the bolts to 17N·m (12.5 lb ft)

Route new hose assembly up between engine and fender. It should come up near the area between the battery and the coolant bottle.
Connect new inlet hose to pump inlet.
Connect old outlet hose to pump outlet.
Connect electrical connector to pump.
Connect electrical connector for solenoid to connector on the new hose assembly.
Connect the hose with the white nipple to the vacuum source hose.
Connect the remaining hose to the shut off valve.
Install shield covering AIR pump.
Lower vehicle.
Remove coolant reservoir nut nearest the battery.
Route new hose assembly between the battery and the coolant reservoir with the solenoid on top.
Install the solenoid bracket onto the coolant reservoir stud and reinstall the nut back into the vehicle.
Use a wire tie to keep the new hose assembly away from the engine. On four cylinder engines, tie to the AIR outlet hose. On six cylinder engines, tie to an available hole in the radiator fan shroud.

12590627 Hose Assembly - Secondary Air Injection

12568324 Pump, Secondary Air Injection for 2001 L35 + 2000-2003 L43/LN2

12560095 Pump, Secondary Air Injection for 1999-2000 L35

Hope that helps

Posted on Mar 06, 2010

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Bleeding brake system in a 1999 dodge 2500 4x4 with cummin


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Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

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Brake pedal is hard but brakes not very effective. booster holds vacuum. replaced booster check valve, no change. dash brake light stays on most of time but sometimes goes out for a while then comes back...


Check the brake fluid first.is it low or no brake fluid at all.is the brake fluid got dried up or leaked out. Sounds like the power brake booster is bad, that is what the master cylinder is bolted too. There is a rubber hose that has a plastic valve in it were it snaps into the booster, Pull that rubber hose out of the booster and off of the engine, Now the end that you took off the engine. You should be able to **** through the line, but not be able to blow through it. If you can then replace the valve, It is a one way valve.
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To check engine vacuum, connect a vacuum gauge to the supply hose that runs from the intake manifold to the booster. A low reading (below 16 inches) may indicate a hose leak or obstruction, a blockage in the exhaust system (plugged catalytic converter, crushed pipe, bad muffler, etc.), or a problem in the engine itself (manifold vacuum leak, bad valve, head gasket, etc.).
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